Feedback on the draft Clinical Care Standard for Stroke

The Australian on Safety and Quality in Healthcare has released a draft document “Clinical Care Standard of Stroke

This is available for comment until the 23rd of May.

The goal of the Clinical Care Standard for Stroke is to improve the early assessment and management of an adult with stroke so as to increase their chance of surviving a stroke, maximise their recovery, and reduce their risk of a future stroke

Even if you aren’t thinking of commenting I urge you to look at both the summary versions, the Consumer Fact Sheet Consultation Draft and the Clinician Fact Sheet Consultation Draft as they remind you of the symptoms to be aware of and the process they are wanting hospitals to undertake to improve early assessment and care.

Medications and the Bushfire Emergency in NSW

The medical observer today had an article on GPs involved in the response effort including helping patients out with lost scripts as people left their homes with minimal or no belongings.

There are two ways you can obtain medications besides seeing your doctor. Your pharmacist can provide three days emergency supply or can contact your doctor on your behalf to confirm the medication and ensure the scripts are sent to the pharmacy “as soon as practicable” as stated in the Poisons and Therapeutic Goods Regulations 2008 (NSW).

There are also ways to have authority prescriptions ordered earlier and pick up an early supply of your medication if you have the script but no medication.

All these are encompassed in the relevant state and federal law but brought together in the the advice provided by the federal Department of Health for areas affected by bushfire.

The document also has information for pharmacists on claiming for prescriptions if phone lines are down or their prescription claim is destroyed by fire.

Download (PDF, 126KB)

Medicines and heatwaves – RGH Pharmacy E-Bulletin

Interaction

Global climate change continues to be the subject of international debate, which has included concern about the health impacts of climate change. Attention has also focused on the impact of ‘heat waves’ on morbidity and mortality.

Over 70,000 additional deaths were recorded in 12 European countries over the summer of 2003 during a prolonged heatwave – after this, a number of related papers were published in medical literature, including some that specifically looked at the potential for increased harm from medicine use during the heatwaves.

A number of countries including Australia have since operationalised ‘National Heat Wave Plans.’ In Australia individual states having developed specific information for to help people to manage in heatwaves, including SA Health’s “Extreme Heat – guide to coping and staying healthy in the heat.”

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A joint initiative of the Patient Services Section and the Drug and Therapeutics Information Service of the Pharmacy Department, Repatriation General Hospital, Daw Park, South Australia. The RGH Pharmacy E-Bulletin is distributed in electronic format on a weekly basis, and aims to present concise, factual information on issues of current interest in therapeutics, drug safety and cost-effective use of medications.
Editor: Assoc. Prof. Chris Alderman, University of South Australia – Director of Pharmacy, RGH © Pharmacy Department, Repatriation General Hospital, Daw Park, South Australia 5041.

Farnesyltransferase inhibitors in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria – RGH Pharmacy E-Bulletin

Interaction

Farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) are a new class of biologically active agents originally developed as potential anticancer drugs, and are currently unavailable in Australia.

FTIs inhibit the enzyme farnesyltransferase, preventing the farnesylation and hence activation of a wide range of target proteins, including Ras (which is mutated in 30 % of all human cancers), ultimately resulting in cell growth arrest. In preclinical models, farnesyl transferase inhibitors showed great potency as a novel anti-cancer agent; yet in clinical studies, the early potential of FTIs were not realised.

This was attributed to several reasons: the molecular pharmacology and biology of FTIs had not yet been fully elucidated, an escape mechanism for the inhibition by FTIs was discovered (known as geranylgeranylation) and a well-defined proof of the concept of clinical studies was lacking.

Download (PDF, 20KB)

A joint initiative of the Patient Services Section and the Drug and Therapeutics Information Service of the Pharmacy Department, Repatriation General Hospital, Daw Park, South Australia. The RGH Pharmacy E-Bulletin is distributed in electronic format on a weekly basis, and aims to present concise, factual information on issues of current interest in therapeutics, drug safety and cost-effective use of medications.
Editor: Assoc. Prof. Chris Alderman, University of South Australia – Director of Pharmacy, RGH © Pharmacy Department, Repatriation General Hospital, Daw Park, South Australia 5041.

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