How are Condoms Made?

The little rubber device to prevent issue is one of the mainstays in preventing the spread of sexually transmitted diseases.

But how are they made? How can we be sure they work?

The following video (made by BillyBoy condoms) explains all including the quality testing. I love the monotone describing the condom brands: “Billy Boy Fun, the condom with the fun factor”.

Did you know the aromatic flavour is added just before packaging? You do now.

update: @ricardon was so amazed that condoms are stress tested to 18 litres he went and looked up how much semen each man produces in his lifetime.

369.6 litres.

Just as well we don’t produce it all at once.

Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record: #HCSMANZ Discussion on Twitter

health care social media Australia and New Zealand

This evening was the second Health Care and Social Media Tweetup. This week the discussion was on the Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record

About the same numbers, a few lurkers and a lot of side conversations compared to last week. Use the #HCSMANZ hashtag when joining in so all can see the discussion.

The transcript of tonight’s meeting is here.

A list of all links placed during the discussion is here

The Tweetup is held each Sunday evening at 22:00NZ, 20:00AEDT, 19:00AEST, 19:30ACDT, 17:00AWST. Next Sunday 19th December will be the last for the year.

If you wish to know more send a message to myself, Ed Butler or Ben Harris-Roxas or follow @hcsmanz on Twitter.

You can set up a hashtag #hcsmanz on your twitter-feed to follow and participate in the discussion and even subscribe to a “newspaper”, The #hcsmanz Daily to see the interesting links produced during the discussion.

There is a #hcsmanz page which shows the last 100 tweets and links to transcripts of each meeting.

We look forward to seeing you next week.

Healthcare and Social Media Discussion on Twitter

health care social media Australia and New Zealand Last night Australia and New Zealand had their inaugural “Tweetup” using the hash-tag #hcsmanz with about 20 participants from nursing, medical, pharmacy, public health, IT and others. A Tweetup will be held each Sunday evening at 22:00NZ, 20:00AEDT, 19:00AEST, 19:30ACDT, 17:00AWST.

Twitter has been in the news a bit in Australia. Mainly due to the Australian newspaper outing a pseudonymous blogger and recently threatening to sue a journalism academic. A view that seems to have been taken by some in the media is that Twitter is full of anonymous trolls defaming away left, right and centre.

What it really is is a terrific for communication and dissemination of information at whatever level you wish to use it, informally or in a more formal manner.

Several regular discussion groups looking at the use of social media in health care meet on twitter at various times. The European Union have one as does the USA and Canada.

Our first discussion looked at the recently released AMA guidelines “Social Media and the Medical Profession” and issues encountered in using social media in your health/healthcare setting. It already seems to have kicked a goal with the transcript being sent to the AMA Council of Doctors-in-Training and Guidelines Working group.

If you wish to know more send a message to myself, Ed Butler or Ben Harris-Roxas or follow @hcsmanz on Twitter.

You can set up a hashtag #hcsmanz on your twitter-feed to follow and participate in the discussion and even subscribe to a “newspaper”, The #hcsmanz Daily to see the interesting links produced during the discussion.

There is a #hcsmanz page which shows the last 100 tweets and links to transcripts of each meeting.

We look forward to seeing you next week.

Before I finish up I thought I would show a couple of the more interesting links placed into the conversation last night.

The first links to “Social Media – Telstra‚Äôs 3 Rs of Social Media Engagement” (PDF) and the second to an interesting slide show titled “IT, Professionalism, and Your Digital Identity” produced by Dr Stuart Morrison for fifth year medical students at Monash University in November.

Paediatric Urinary Tract Infections

I’ve found an interesting sideshow from the Cleveland Clinic looking at the epidemiology, pathogenesis and microbiology and treatment of paediatric urinary tract infections. It is full of interesting facts.

111 circumcisions are needed to prevent one paediatric urinary tract infection?

While for an American audience (which is far away from remote aboriginal health!) it is well worth a look.

UTI in Children

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